Major Work Year 10

New Date Discussed 16/12/16

What is expected from a Major Work?

But first...

What is a Major Work?



Outcomes: 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10

Commencing Date:
Week 7 | Term 4 | 2016

Due Date: 

Note: (New Date Discussed 06/12/16) | Students have written their briefs as to what they will be accomplishing for their Major Works |


NSW Board Of Studies Visual Art Syllabus States:



A Major Work – It is referred to as a single or multiple pieces of ARTWORK THAT REFLECTS your artistic skills, ideas and values. It demonstrates your commitment to artmaking and the resolution of your ideas expressed in a visual manner. You are not only expected to produced the works, but also think about how you can convey meaning through:


the selection of ideas
the selection and organization of your work
the development of ways to represent both your skills and ideas



This is not an easy process. Don’t think you can get it done in a short amount of time. You will need to develop skills in handling the materials, and refine your ideas to ensure the makers in this case Mr Tafa’i will need to understand clearly your intentions. You really do have to work solidly and consistently through the duration of time.

Artmaking or the Body of Work what is the Major Work?


Students will submit a body of work as a compulsory part of the examination. In this body of work they

 

  • should demonstrate their understanding of artmaking as a practice

 

  • represent their ideas and interests through their interpretation of subject matter and use of expressive forms.

 

  • They should consider their own resolve in selecting works for examination with a view to representing a coherent point of view and in relation to the conceptual strength and meaning of works produced.

 

The body of work must comply with the overall prescribed dimensions for HSC submitted artworks in Visual Arts Stage 6 in terms of overall limitations on size, weight, volume and duration as set out below. The body of work must be conceived of, and executed by, the student under the supervision of the Visual Arts teacher.

 

  • Lead-up work in a student’s Visual Arts Process Diary, along with other lead-up work, and other work produced and not submitted as the body of work, must be available to verify and provide further evidence of a student’s artmaking.

Course Prescriptions — Overall limitations on size, weight, and duration of HSC 

practiced submitted works.

 

The following information about HSC Body of Work should be read in conjunction with the Outcomes, Course Requirements and Assessment.


These rules apply to all bodies of work submitted for the HSC Visual Arts examination and should be strictly adhered to. Failure to comply with these rules could penalize marks awarded to students.


• A body of work may be submitted in one or more of the expressive forms.


• Individual works within a body of work must not exceed 2 square metres in area. This applies to flat, rigid works and includes works that may form part of a series.


• A body of work must not exceed 6 minutes running time.


• Individual works, within a body of work, exceeding 2 square metres and up to 6 square metres must be rolled.


• A body of work in its entirety must not exceed 34.4 kilograms in weight when packed for marking.


• A body of work must not exceed 1 cubic metre in volume. This measurement means that:


The absolute volume of any three-dimensional work must not be more than 1 cubic metre. In determining this volume, the height is the perpendicular height of the work when displayed for marking. The width is the measurement taken at the two furthest points and the breadth is the measurement taken at right angles to the width. The width X breadth X height (measured in metres) must not exceed 1 cubic metre. (Positive and negative areas are calculated in this measurement).


• Lead-up work in a student’s Visual Arts Process Diary, along with other lead-up work, and other work produced and not submitted as the body of work, must be available, if required in the event of appeals, to verify and provide further evidence of a student’s artmaking.


• Individual works must not be framed under glass or rigid plastic sheeting.

• Dangerous materials must not be used. Any HSC Body of Work submission that may be considered dangerous to health or safety may not be marked or returned to schools if marked in corporate marking. Any individual work within a Body of Work considered dangerous to health or safety may not be unpacked for corporate marking or may not be marked in itinerant marking. Works considered dangerous could include those with faulty electrical wiring and/or those which incorporate very sharp points or cutting edges such as glass, mirror fragments, barbed wire, rusty corrugated iron and/or broken machinery. Hypodermic

syringes, needles, bodily secretions and blood products must not be included in any artworks.



• Submissions involving a high voltage electrical current (eg 240 volts) must carry a certificate for electrical safety. Any electrical wiring necessary for artworks should be undertaken by suitably qualified personnel. Details and records of such work should also be noted in students’ diaries.



• Items within a body of work must be able to be safely and reasonably handled by one person.



• Works must be stable in their construction to minimise any damage during handling.



• Mannequins must not be included with submissions of Wearables in the Designed Objects and Environments category.

 

The teacher must retain students’ diaries until the marking of submitted artworks is complete. This requirement is necessary if the body of work needs further verification or authentication and in cases of appeals being made by the teacher

 

Presentation and Packaging of HSC Body of Work

 

All works or series of works must be clearly labelled with the student’s number, school number, number of pieces in the submission and the expressive form. In this case students name will be marked clearly.

 

Framing and/or mounting of artworks in a body of work is not necessary. In the case of series of works, it is recommended that they are presented flat, or in a folder or box. If works are mounted, simple cardboard mounts are preferred.

 

Works in a series can be numbered to indicate the sequential order for marking.

 

Glass or rigid plastic must not be used in any framing of works as it impedes close inspection of the submission. It is easily broken and may cause damage to the work and/or markers.

 

Mannequins must not be included with submissions of Wearables in the Designed Objects and Environments Category.

 

Artworks must be stable in their construction to minimise any damage during handling. During marking artworks may be handled many times.

 

Artworks of a very substantial nature are best left unwrapped for transportation and handling — carriers prefer to see what they are carrying.

 

Any specialised equipment other than that required for Film and Video, Digital Animation and Interactives, must be provided by the student. Such equipment will be returned at the conclusion of the marking period.

 

 

 

Assessment – 100% total

 

Assessment should include ongoing evaluations of a student’s ability to:

 

• represent their understandings of artmaking as a practice involving the selection of particular procedures and critical judgement.

 

• apply the conceptual framework of art involving artist, artwork, world, audience to the development of their body of work.

 

• use one or more of the frames to represent points of view in their interpretations.

 

• develop meaning and focus in the representation of ideas reflected in the developing body of work evident in the lead-up work in diaries, works under development, in the body of work, and student explanations.




 

Answer the questions below:

  1. What is a Body of Work?

  2. What is the difference of a Body of Work and Major Work?

  3. What involves a Major Work and name the types of artwork you can do?

  4. Can the Major work be any size, weight and volume?

  5. What is involved in a Visual Art Dairy and what is another name for Visual Art Dairy?

  6. Are students allowed to use within their artworks hypodermic syringes, needles, bodily secretions and blood products?

  7. Mounting and framing are they necessary and what about glass framing are they allowed?

  8. What’s involved in an assessment and how is it assessed?

Comments